Every MP that could be hit by Boris Johnson second job ban

SNP MP put on the spot over Ian Blackford's second role

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MPs are entitled to provide consultancy work for businesses but in the wake of the Owen Paterson scandal, questions have been raised about the morals of this practice. MPs and members of the public are calling for greater transparency as well as stricter rules for MPs who undertake work outside their parliamentary roles. Here is a full list of the MPs who earn money for consultancy or advisory work and who could likely be impacted by the proposed rule change from Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

MPs receive a basic salary of £81,932, but they are also able to pursue secondary professions so long as they do not breach any conduct rules from their parliamentary work.

These public workers must declare any earnings above £100 from second jobs.

MPs are also banned from asking questions, approaching ministers or introducing legislation in return for payment.

There is no limit on the number of hours an MP can earn for outside work – but now this secondary employment has come under a microscope after Owen Paterson was found to have lobbied the Government on behalf of a company which paid him.

The House of Commons is expected to endorse the original parliamentary standards report into disgraced Conservative Party MP Owen Paterson.

The former environment minister was found to have breached rules over paid advocacy.

The PM botched an attempt to reform the standards regime to protect Mr Paterson – sparking an uproar over MPs’ outside interests.

This ignited accusations of sleaze which have dominated headlines over the past couple of weeks.

In a letter to Commons Speaker Si Lindsay Hoyle, the PM said MPs should adopt a ban “as a matter of urgency”.

He added the ban would stop MPs from “exploiting their positions”.

Mr Johnson said: “An MP’s primary role is, and must be, to serve their constituents and to represent their interests in Parliament.”

The Prime Minister said the code of conduct should be updated so that Parliament “continues to command the trust of the public”.

A ban would require a change to the MPs’ code of conduct, which requires a formal vote in the House of Commons.

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How many MPs will be affected by Boris Johnson’s second job ban?

Cabinet Ministers are not permitted to have secondary jobs as their MP roles in addition to their Cabinet position is considered to be two jobs.

However, several other MPs do undertake consultancy work which means they could face losing out on income as a result of the ban.

Mr Johnson’s proposals would see a recommendation originally made in a 2018 report from ethic watchdog the Committee on Standards in Public Life.

It is thought this proposal would impact around 30 MPs.

These 31 MPs would include 30 Conservatives and one Liberal Democrat.

The highest earners include the Sutton Coldfield MP Andrew Mitchell who receives £182,600 a year for 32.5 days work.

His work predominantly involves investment and accountancy work with Ernst & Young and Investec.

The former minister Chris Grayling is likely to lose out on around £100,000 a year from Hutchison Ports Europe, while the former chief whip Julian Smith will take home £144,000 a year from firms if the rule change is enacted.

The MPs are:

  • Andrew Mitchell, Sutton Coldfield (Conservative)
  • Julian Smith, Skipton and Ripon (Conservative)
  • Chris Grayling, Epsom and Ewell (Conservative)
  • Mark Garnier, Wyre Forest (Conservative)
  • Sir Ed Davey, Kingston and Surbiton (Liberal Democrats)
  • Alun Cairns, Vale of Glamorgan (Conservative)
  • Ruth Edwards, Rushcliffe (Conservative)
  • Stephen Hammond, Wimbledon (Conservative)
  • Steve Brine, Winchester (Conservative)
  • David Davis, Haltemprice and Howden (Conservative)
  • Sir John Hayes, South Holland and The Deepings (Conservative)
  • Sir Iain Duncan Smith, Chingford and Woodford Green (Conservative)
  • Damian Green, Ashford (Conservative)
  • Tim Loughton, East Worthing and Shoreham (Conservative)
  • Daniel Kawczynski, Shrewsbury and Atcham (Conservative)
  • Andrew Percy, Brigg and Goole (Conservative)
  • Khalid Mahmood, Birmingham Perry Barr (Labour)
  • Laurence Robertson, Tewkesbury (Conservative)
  • Richard Fuller, North East Bedfordshire (Conservative)
  • Sir Robert Neill, Bromley and Chislehurst (Conservative)
  • Royston Smith, Southampton, Itchen (Conservative)
  • Sir Greg Knight, east Yorkshire (Conservative)
  • Ben Everitt, Milton Keynes North (Conservative)
  • Andrew Bridgen, North West Leicestershire (Conservative)
  • Philip Davies, Shipley (Conservative)
  • Sir Graham Brady, Altrincham and Sale West (Conservative)
  • Chris Skidmore, Kingswood (Conservative)
  • Paul Maynard, Blackpool North and Cleveleys (Conservative)
  • John Redwood, Wokingham (Conservative)
  • Andrew Lewer, Northampton South (Conservative)
  • Dean Russell, Watford (Conservative).

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