People told to stop kissing for immediate future to halt coronavirus spread

With more than 80 people in the UK now diagnosed with coronavirus, extreme measures are being called for to limit its spread.

Experts have even gone as far as to advise Brits to stop kissing each other in a desperate bid to keep the virus under control.

TV host Professor Robert Winston has suggesting kissing is a no-go for the foreseeable future.

He said: "We have to realise that we should not be touching our nose, our mouth, our eyes."

His advice was supported by Tory peer Lord Bethell, who said: "Kissing is wonderful but potentially dangerous."

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People touch their noses between 70 and 100 times a day on average without realising, The Sun reports.

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the UK has dramatically risen from 51 to 85 patients in a day, the Department of Health has said.

Thirty-four more people were diagnosed with the coronavirus yesterday, bringing the total of confirmed cases in the UK to 85.

The Department of Health said 16,659 people have been tested, with 16,574 testing negative.

Chris Whitty, the UK's chief medical adviser said it was not yet clear how the individuals had been infected.

He said it is "likely" the UK will see "some deaths" from the disease and a rapid rise in infections in the next six weeks.

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It comes as a GP issued a stark warning about the growing coronavirus crisis from the front line of healthcare.

Devon GP Dr Ian Hodgins told an interviewer from BBC Radio Devon that “people will die” before the crisis is over.

He said: "I think we have to take this very, very seriously as there will be Devon people who will die from this," he said.

"What the government are trying to do is slow down the transmission of it.

"It's likely this will become widespread, but if we can slow it down for long enough, maybe we can get an immunisation.”

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